5 Important Reasons to Visit a Farm in Vermont

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If you’re interested in rural living, I hope you have the chance to visit a farm in Vermont. When I was first married, I spent several years living on a dairy farm. I got to bottle feed the calves and muck out the cow stalls. While I wouldn’t say it was all fun and games, it was an important look into the origin of our food. Most of the elementary schools in my area have field trips each year so the kids can learn about it. I attended a free event and am sharing my experience with you.

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5 Important Reasons to Visit a Farm in Vermont

Visit a Farm in Vermont

I enjoyed an excellent breakfast and was then able to take a self-guided tour through the farm where I learned more about different areas of farming. I got a deeper look into what went into growing crops and caring for the soil.

  1. Farms feed people. It may seem like common sense, but there are some school children, especially in the cities, who do not connect their carton of milk or French fries with where they come from. Before you can buy food in your grocery store, it’s grown or produced on a farm. Taking the kids to a farm is a great way for them to learn.
  2. Our actions matter. Without pollinators, our crops would not produce. The weed spray and bug spray you use in your yard end up in our streams and fields. They end up in the water our livestock drinks and the grounds our crops grow.
  3. Buying local helps our economy. By purchasing locally grown meat, dairy and produce, we support our local farmers. You can find local products at your co-op and farmer’s markets, but you can probably find them in your grocery store too. Purchasing local products puts money back into the local economy, and that helps everyone.
  4. Farming is a way of life, not a job. Farming is 24/7 and 365 days a year. You don’t get holidays off, and it isn’t a 9-5 job. It impacts every facet of how you live. It’s a way of life that’s disappearing as massive factory farms replace family owned farms. Learn more about it while you can.
  5. It’s more than cows. Most family farms are about more than cows. They grow crops, have sheep and horses, use sustainable energy, tap maple trees for syrup, make goat’s milk soap and do a variety of other tasks.

5 Important Reasons to Visit a Farm in Vermont

Visit a Farm in Vermont

I visited the Nea-Tocht Farm in Ferrisburgh, Vermont for the first of two Vermont Breakfast on the Farm events. The 500-cow, 800-acre farm is owned and operated by Raymond and Linda Vander Wey, along with their children and grandchildren. The farm has earned acclaim for their high-quality milk, and in 2000 won The New England Green Pastures Dairy Farm of the Year award.

5 Important Reasons to Visit a Farm in Vermont

The Vermont Agency of Agriculture is the lead organizing partner of Vermont Breakfast on the Farm. The goal is to provide a first-hand look at modern food production and the farm families who work hard to produce a safe, wholesome food supply. Educational stations offer learning and exploration. Knowledgeable volunteers will highlight how farmers care for the environment, their animals, and their community.

For more information, visit www.VermontBreakfastonTheFarm.com, email vermontbreakfastonthefarm@gmail.com, or call Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets at (802) 828-2430. The second Vermont Breakfast on the Farm will be hosted by the Rowell family on August 27 at Green Mountain Dairy Farm in Sheldon, Vermont. Breakfast will be served between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

5 Important Reasons to Visit a Farm in Vermont

More resources:

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Comments

  1. My kids would have a blast visiting a farm!! What a great way to spend the day and learn about where milk comes from.
  2. I have such respect for farmers since I know they work so hard. My grandfather was a farmer and I grew up as a teen across the road from a farm. Sometimes we would have livestock in our yard (that escaped)! Before moving to the country we lived in town, but across the street from the grain elevator, so I have memories of hearing that in the early morning and watching the farmers at the feed mill store. Miss those days and a simpler life.
  3. That's a great idea to have kids visit a farm. It is amazing how hard and how much the farmers work. It's neat that the farm you visited is worked by 3 generations. Thanks for sharing.
  4. I would LOVE to visit a farm like that! I've always found farms to be so attractive. But only smaller farms like these.
  5. Ahhh.... Farm life! I honestly think it's important for everyone to visit farms. Farmers are the backbone of America! Your Vermont farm reminds me of our local dairy farm. Every school age child in our area has taken a class field trip to Dejong's Dairy. We shop there regularly and visit the animals in the petting area. Kids of all ages love it. In fact, I had a friend visit from Texas and her young daughter saw the ocean for the first time among many other SoCal activities but her favorite was visiting the dairy farm Ha!
  6. I love learning about the local farms. These farms work so hard to produce and care for all their livestock or produce. There stuff also tastes way better than buying from a grocery store. It's much fresher, and it's also good to know where my food is coming from.

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