Create a Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

Do you have a fire safety exit plan for your family? We all know the importance of fire safety but is it something you practice regularly with your family? It’s all too easy to become complacent about fire safety once we’ve installed a smoke detector. But, there is a lot more to fire prevention than that. This post is sponsored and a product is provided. This post contains affiliate links, and I will receive compensation if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

Create a Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

 

Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

October is Fire Prevention Month so it’s the perfect time to sit down with your family and really put together an action plan that includes a fire safety exit plan for your home. It’s important that everyone in your family knows what to do in case of an emergency. Here are a few things to consider this month.

Create a Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

Replace and Test Alarms

Did you know that you should have a smoke and fire alarm and carbon monoxide alarm on each level of your home? That means that your basement, first and second floors, and attic should all have working alarms. When was the last time that these alarms were replaced or tested? Take time today to check that they are all still in good working order. Replace the batteries or consider replacing the alarm itself if it’s showing its age.

Create a Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

Have a Fire Safety Exit Plan

In case of an emergency, it’s important that every member of your household knows how to safely exit your home and where to go once they’re outside. Children need to know how to escape your home on their own in case you cannot get to them. Make sure that you practice your exit plan at least once a year both during the day and at night. Download a copy of this grid to create a map of your home.

Create a Fire Safety Exit Plan for Fire Prevention Month

Discuss Fire Safety

Have you had a fire safety discussion with everyone in the home? Now is the perfect time to do that! Make sure that younger children know not to play with matches or the knobs on stoves and heaters. Make sure that older children know to never leave a candle burning in a room when they aren’t in it. Be sure to discuss the best way to put out cooking fires if they are old enough to cook by themselves. Did you know that grease fires should be put out with baking soda and not water? Do your kids? Can they use the fire extinguisher?

First Alert is encouraging everyone to unleash their own superpowers with the “Super Prepared Family” to help spread awareness about home fire safety. It’s important to put together a Fire Prevention Kit that includes smoke and fire alarms, carbon monoxide alarm, and a fire extinguisher spray. Test your equipment regularly and replace it as necessary. First Alert products can be purchased at a variety of retailers near you.

One of my readers will win a Fire Prevention Kit that contains the following:

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Comments

  1. Julie Waldron says:
    I learned that U.S. Fire Departments responded to a fire every 23 seconds in 2015.
  2. The Combo Smoke and CO alarm has no annoying low battery chirps.
  3. Jill Jeffrey says:
    I learned how many detectors, alarms, and extinguishers you should have in your house on each level.
  4. I learned about 10 year alarms, they are great to have.
  5. I learned they have a very nice 2-story Escape Ladder that requires no assembly and holds over 1000 pounds. I live on the second floor of an apartment building and really could use this off my balcony if I need to escape quickly.
  6. Annmarie W. says:
    I see that 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms. What a shame that so many deaths could be preventable! 
  7. I learned "3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms." That's very sad.
  8. I learned that Find First Alert at your favorite retailer - lowes, ace hardware, target, walmart, costco, amazon
  9. commented here https://in-our-spare-time.com/scratch-and-create-books/#comment-18615
  10. It is important! Many people underestimate what happens if a fire starts. I've been calling our fire marshall's office, even talked with the chief, our complex installed hardware on the fire doors that holds them open. That is against code but I can't get them to do anything about it. I'm trying to find out what recourse I have. FIre doors are supposed to stay shut, as the stairwells are your exit in a fire (not the elevator). If they are open, the fire goes into the stairwells, and also acts like a chimney making the fire much worse and not keeping it contained. I'm shocked out town won't do anything to stop this fire code violation.
  11. angela smith says:
    “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!” is so important. It reinforces why everyone needs to have an escape pla
  12. Stacey Roberson says:
    I learned that the U.S. Fire Departments responded to a fire every 23 seconds in 2015.
  13. I learned that you should have a Carbon Monoxide alarm on every level & near each sleeping area!
  14. I Learned that you can draw a map of your house on the website, gridding out each room and your exit plans. That is super neat!
  15. jeremy mclaughlin says:
    I learned more about the 10 year alarms.
  16. Lindsay Hess says:
    I learned that 3 out of 5 home fire deaths result from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms.
  17. Juanita May says:
    I learned that 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms. That is way to high for a device that is not that expensive or hard to install.
  18. Bea Alexandra says:
    I learned the ideal amount of extinguishers and alarms each home should have depending on their sizes.
  19. Kayla Klontz says:
    I learned about the 10 year alarms.
  20. Leah Shumack says:
    I learned that 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms.
  21. Nichole McK says:
    I learned about the placement of alarms and realized I need to make some changes in my home
  22. Hollie Jahnke says:
    I learned you should have a carbon monoxide alarm on each floor. We don't have one upstairs so I will be getting one very soon.
  23. Stephanie Grant says:
    I learned that U.S. Fire Departments responded to a fire every 23 seconds in 2015.

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